Category Archives: gardening

4 Tips For Sowing Garden Seeds

If you are growing a garden you have to plant seeds, right?  Planting seeds can sometimes be a little tricky.  There are so many different sizes and shapes and each seed has its own requirements.

Planting seeds is not difficult; it just needs to be done right.  It is disheartening to put the effort in planting your garden and not getting anything or having very few seeds come up.

I planted early carrots in the hoop house and very few came up.  I think the seed was old and pass its prime, kinda’ like me.  There are a lot of variables with seeds that you will learn as you garden.

Let’s start with seed sizes

Have you tried to sow those tiny little carrot seeds, or take lettuce; the seeds are so small that you usually get too many in a row and they are crowded.  What to do?  I have one of those little inexpensive hand sowers.  It looks like a dial with a spout.  You may have seen them in the catalogs.

It is very simple, but gets the job done.  That is my kind of tool.  You lift the top off, place the seeds inside, turn the dial to the correct size for the seed and tap until the seed falls off the end of the spout.  Simple!

Covering small seeds is a critical process  

It just takes a very light covering of soil to get these tiny seeds to germinate.  If you get them too deep they will not come up.  In the warm summer sun I will place a cloth over the seeds and keep watered well to get them started.  Once they sprout I remove the cloth.  Shade can be a good thing in the middle of the season.

To cover small seeds I will pick up a handful of loose soil and sift it through my fingers, letting it fall on the seeds very lightly.  Sometimes I will use very fine compost, if I have any.

Sowing larger seeds is pretty straight forward

But, there are a couple of tricks you may like to hear.  Watch your seed depth.  Each seed packet will have directions for plant that seed.  Try to follow the directions the best you can.

Something you may want to try is tamping the soil down over the row when done.  This provides good seed and soil contact and removes some of the air around the seed.  Don’t pack the soil, just firm it over the row.

Beans have a hard time getting up through the soil crust  

I like to put compost over the row of beans rather than pulling the soil into the row.  I just tamp it down like I do the soil and the beans have an easier time breaking through the compost than soil.  If you live with a sandy soil you may not have any problems, but if you are on clay soil, as I am, it tends to crust over and the beans will not be able to fully push their heads through the crust.

When I am done planting a row of seeds I will soak the row with water.  Every couple of days, depending on the weather I will water until the seeds get a start.  This ensures the seeds get through the ground.  If they lay there too long they can rot.

Temperature is also important.  Wait until the soil is warm enough to sprout the seeds before planting.  How warm you ask?  Depends.  Every seed is different.  Your seed packed will give you a lot of info about that.

Hope that is a help to getting your seeds in the ground and growing this spring and summer.

Great gardening,
Steve

Steve Wisley has been gardening organically for over a quarter of a century.  Gardening is a great way to, not only, grow great tasting, healthy, chemical free food that is good for your family, but gardening is reconnecting with your soul.  It is getting your hands in the stuff that life is based upon, and it can heal some of hurt you feel inside.  

Steve started this blog to guide others in starting and improving their organic garden to produce healthy, nutritious, great tasting food for their family.  Pick up your copy of the booklet “6 Easy Common Sense Tips To Ban Bugs From Your Garden Without Chemicals”.

 

What To Do About Those @#$% Deer And Rabbits

I don’t know how it is where you live, but I have deer and rabbits grazing in my garden.  The rabbits really are a bigger pest, in my garden, than the deer.

The deer used to just nip their way through the garden, except for the strawberries and the beans.  But, I would keep the beans close to the house, and that helped.

But, those darn rabbits can get into anything.  First, was the rabbit proof wire I purchased.  They forget to tell the rabbits they could not get through it.  Then, I changed to chicken wire 2 feet high around the beans, but they either dug under, or hopped over.

So, I said enough is enough.  Farm fence about 42 inches high was placed around two sides of part of the garden.  My garden is divided into two sections.  Then, we went with 5 foot wire up to the gate, and then cattle panels down to the first fence again.  

Next, chicken wire 4 feet high was strung around the inside of the cattle panels and over to the 5 foot fence.  This area is used for the smaller vegetables the rabbits love.  And the farm fence keeps the deer out with bird netting on top.

For rabbits in the larger section of the garden, I place shorter chicken wire held by temporary stakes around any new plants until they are big enough that the rabbits leave them alone.

I know it is a lot of trouble and expense, but now I can finally garden in peace.  I had tried about everything you can think of before.  Bird netting was carefully placed over the strawberries, held up by wire bowed over the rows.  The deer just stuck that big nose under the netting and helped themselves to strawberries leaves.

The present system has solved most of the rabbit and deer problems, but it takes constant upkeep.  If the bird netting falls down in one area, sooner or later, a deer will venture into the garden.  

The chicken wire must be checked often as those little buggers will keep trying to slip under the wire all the time.  When I find a spot they have managed to get under I will place a rock there and they will leave it alone to look for another weak spot.

As with most things in life gardening has its own set of problems.  It is your job to figure out how to overcome the obstacles.  That is what gives you character…right?

Great gardening,
Steve

Steve Wisley has been gardening organically for over a quarter of a century.  Gardening is a great way to, not only, grow great tasting, healthy, chemical free food that is good for your family, but gardening is reconnecting with your soul.  It is getting your hands in the stuff that life is based upon, and it can heal some of hurt you feel inside.  

Steve started this blog to guide others in starting and improving their organic garden to produce healthy, nutritious, great tasting food for their family.  Pick up your copy of the booklet “6 Easy Common Sense Tips To Ban Bugs From Your Garden Without Chemicals”.
 

Pink Slime

Have you read about “pink slime” in the news?  Pink slime is a beef byproduct added to hamburger.

More officially it is described as a mix of fatty beef by-products and connective tissue, ground up and treated with ammonium hydroxide to kill the bacteria, and mixed with ground beef.

Why am I writing about hamburger in a gardening blog?  It is yet another example of how our food supply is being used as a marketing tool, instead of being a safe nutritious food that will build our health.

The large food producers, whether meat or produce, are out for maximum profit, not to produce the most nutritious food they can for their customers.  In fact, it seems as if they go out of their way to make the unhealthiest product they possibly can, then see if they can get their buddies down at the USDA to pass the trash they put out.

This is the biggest reason I grow my own food.  I realize that if I am going to have quality food that tastes good I will have to grow my own or find someone who grows their food in the right way to buy from.

It is getting to the place that to avoid chemicals in your body and to get the most nutritious food you can one must take matters into their own hands.

Even trying to raise your own food with compost has its problems.  You must be careful what materials you use to make compost.  Many of the things we use like grass clippings, straw, anything from the neighbors, may be contaminated with chemicals.

Many gardeners have found that the compost they purchased will slow the growth of their plants, if not outright kill them, because the compost was made from plants treated with Roundup.  Yes, if will last that long and survive the compost process.

So, you may wonder, can I get meat for my family?  The best place to get meat is from a local farmer who raises grass-fed only beef.  We have been sold a bill of goods about the quality of grain fed meat.  Yes, it taste good, but when the animal is fed grain, instead of grass, as God intended, it changes the nutrition of the meat.

Remember, you are what you eat is not just of us.

Please consider where your food is coming from, and how it is produced and processed.  It can make a tremendous difference in your family’s health.

Great gardening,
Steve

Steve Wisley has been gardening organically for over a quarter of a century.  Gardening is a great way to, not only, grow great tasting, healthy, chemical free food that is good for your family, but gardening is reconnecting with your soul.  It is getting your hands in the stuff that life is based upon, and it can heal some of hurt you feel inside.  

Steve started this blog to guide others in starting and improving their organic garden to produce healthy, nutritious, great tasting food for their family.  Pick up your copy of the booklet “6 Easy Common Sense Tips To Ban Bugs From Your Garden Without Chemicals”.
 

More About Peas

Have you planted your peas?  My first batch of peas are through the ground.  It is always satisfying to see the first crop come up.  Kinda’ gives you hope for the new year.

Now that the peas are growing what do you do?  The first thing I suggest is to plant another row.  If you like peas as much as I do you will want lots of them.  I will plant at least two crops of them, and more if one of the crops does not do well.  

Don’t worry too much about the space as peas are done early in the summer and you can plant something new in their spot.  Peas produce their own nitrogen, so you will have extra nitrogen where they grow.

Those new arrivals will need some special care.  In the spring the weeds grow as fast, or faster, than your vegetables.  So, you will want to keep on top of the peas while they are young.

While they are small I will go down the row with a hoe and carefully slice off the new weeds.  I plant in double rows, so that means I will cut the weeds between the rows and on the outside of each row.

As soon as the peas get about four inches high I like to go through and hoe the weeds again, and pull the weeds mixed in with the peas.  It helps to do this when the ground is moist so you will not disturb the young pea plants.  And, I like to put about a half-inch of compost down the row.  This helps mulch the ground and provides another dose of nutrients.

Remember, to save all the weeds you pull or cut out of the garden to put on the compost pile.  Everything counts.

Now is the time to put up the trellis.  I always trellis the peas, even if the package says they can stand alone.  My experience has taught me that peas tend to fall over and that makes them hard to pick.  Plus, peas climbing a trellis look pretty.

After the trellis is in place it is time to carefully place some mulch around the plants.  I use mostly straw, as it is readily available in this area.  If there are leftover leaves from the fall I will use them until they run out.  Handle the young pea plants very easily, as they are really tender.

My trellis is some old 2 X 4 wire that is cut into sections I can handle.  I use short fence post or 2 X 2 wooden stakes tall enough to hold the wire with the weight of the peas.

That’s about it.  Peas do not have very many pests, except rabbits and deer, which we will discuss in detail in the next post.

You will want to check the peas for ripeness every day or so.  I like to gently squeeze the pods to see how full they are.  Sometimes a fat pod will look ready, but not have very big seeds inside.

Hope you enjoy your peas.  If you have not grown peas you will be amazed at how sweet and plump they are right out of your own garden.

Great gardening,
Steve

Steve Wisley has been gardening organically for over a quarter of a century.  Gardening is a great way to, not only, grow great tasting, healthy, chemical free food that is good for your family, but gardening is reconnecting with your soul.  It is getting your hands in the stuff that life is based upon, and it can heal some of hurt you feel inside.  

Steve started this blog to guide others in starting and improving their organic garden to produce healthy, nutritious, great tasting food for their family.  Pick up your copy of the booklet “6 Easy Common Sense Tips To Ban Bugs From Your Garden Without Chemicals”.
 

Plant Your Garden In Wide Rows

Over the years I have tried many different “innovations” and one of them that stuck is planting in wide rows.  What is a wide row, you ask?  My explanation of a wide row is one wider than a single row of vegetables.

After trying different widths I have settled on a 30 inch wide row.  Why 30 inches?  A 30 inch row is wide enough to plant any thing I want to plant, but I can still step across the row.

One of the biggest benefits is that I form my 30 inch rows with a 12 inch walk way between the beds and leave them that way semi-permanently.  I would say it was a permanent design, but I am always changing things, like making the garden bigger or adding a hoop house in one corner.

Having permanent rows is a big advantage because you can build up the fertility in the row, eliminate compaction and have a set design to work with every year.  You will get to the place that you will not need to till before planting because the soil, if you are using compost, is so loose you can just make a row and plant.  Every once-in-awhile I will deeply loosen the soil with a spading fork.

Your plants will do better in a wide row because they are close together.  You can actually grow more by planting in multiple rows or by broadcasting the seed.  I plant my green beans in double rows down the middle of the beds and mulch between the rows and on the outsides of the rows.  I could get even more beans by broadcasting, but they are a pain to pick and I like to have fresh beans to eat as long as I can with each batch.

The beds are wide enough for a single row of tomatoes with their cages.  But, if you plant a long row of tomatoes it is wise to leave a space between two tomato cages in the middle of the row, so you can cross over without going all the way to the end.

When planted close together the plants will shade out weeds, meaning less work for you.  They require less water because they shade the ground.  I have noticed my garden does better than the others around me because I plant in wide rows, mulch the rows and use only compost.

Bigger plants like broccoli I plant in a single row and mulch.  Cabbage is a great plant for the wide row as you can stagger the plants to get them closer together and they will completely shade the ground and have almost no weeds.  I plant broccoli about 18 inches apart and cabbage about 12 inches in a zigzag pattern.

Hope this gets you creative juices flowing and stimulates some new ideas for your garden.

Great gardening,
Steve

Steve Wisley has been gardening organically for over a quarter of a century.  Gardening is a great way to, not only, grow great tasting, healthy, chemical free food that is good for your family, but gardening is reconnecting with your soul.  It is getting your hands in the stuff that life is based upon, and it can heal some of hurt you feel inside.  

Steve started this blog to guide others in starting and improving their organic garden to produce healthy, nutritious, great tasting food for their family.  Pick up your copy of the booklet “6 Easy Common Sense Tips To Ban Bugs From Your Garden Without Chemicals”.

 

Planting Potatoes

If is almost time to plant potatoes in my temperature zone, which is the north side of zone 6, right next to zone 5.  The old saying is to “plant your potatoes on Good Friday rain or dry”.  I don’t like to buck old sayings, but I plant potatoes any time I can.

As with most plants in the garden the season starts the year before.  In a perfect world I prefer to plant potatoes after a cover crop, like clover.  But, my garden does not happen to be in a perfect world, and I am not a perfect gardener.

There are better methods for planting potatoes than others.  I could not use cover crops for many years, because of the deer.  There would not be anything to turn under, but the deer had a smile on their faces.

What I usually do is try to plant potatoes where a light feeder crop like green beans has been raised.  I used to lay out a plot the size for the amount of potatoes I wanted to grow, till deeply and apply compost heavily in the row.

Now, the planting process has evolved.  Finding it hard to keep potatoes all winter I now have another method.  

How I plant potatoes

Since I do not keep vary many potatoes over winter I plant potatoes all summer.  I don’t do a lot of tilling or working the soil.  My potato seed comes from organic potatoes purchased at the local organic food co-op.  

Here’s how I plant potatoes

As soon as the early morning frosts start to slow down I start planting.  Potatoes can be froze back and come out again.   I only plant a few potatoes at a time and keep planting potatoes all summer.  That way I am always harvesting new potatoes right into fall.  

I try not to get too far ahead of myself and grow only what I will use until the next potato gets ready.  Planting a couple of different maturing varieties will help with this.

Instead of deeply tilling, planting in deep furrows and hilling the potato I just make a row deep enough to cover the cuttings and cover them.  My soil has a lot of fertility built up over the years so I do not need to add much to it every year.

Here are the steps that I use to plant my potatoes:

1.    Take a potato that is starting to open its eyes.  I like to see the sprouts starting to come out, but do not want very big sprouts, as they are easy to knock off.  Cut the potato into pieces with at least one good eye to each piece.  Leave a fair amount of potato with the eye for food to get started.  
2.    Let the eyes sit for a day to “heal”, this helps to form a surface barrier to the elements.
3.    Clean any weeds and old mulch from the row.
4.    Make a furrow deep enough to cover the cuttings.
5.    Push each piece into the soil at the bottom of the furrow with the eye up.  This is to make good contact with the soil.  I plant a foot to eighteen inches apart.
6.    Cover the furrow with soil and firm the soil over the row.
7.    Put about an inch of compost over the row.
8.    After the potatoes are up a few inches I weed the row and start to hill the row by taking the hoe and pulling dirt up around each plant down the row.
9.    I hill the row 2 or 3 times, then the last time I hill I put compost down beside each row and cover with straw.  Put on a heavy layer of mulch, but leave plenty of the plant leaves out for the plant to catch sun.
10.    That’s it you are done until you start to harvest.

I occasionally walk by the row and pull any weeds that made it through the mulch and watch for potato beetles.

As the new potatoes get large enough I start to steal them for dinner.  You cannot new potatoes steamed with organic butter on top.

There are several ways to get potatoes without even having a garden.  This is the method I use that suits my situation.  If you do not have a garden you can grow potatoes in a bag, wood frame or anything to hold the dirt.

Hope this gives you an idea of how to grow potatoes.

Great gardening,
Steve

Steve Wisley has been gardening organically for over a quarter of a century.  Gardening is a great way to, not only, grow great tasting, healthy, chemical free food that is good for your family, but gardening is reconnecting with your soul.  It is getting your hands in the stuff that life is based upon, and it can heal some of hurt you feel inside.  

Steve started this blog to guide others in starting and improving their organic garden to produce healthy, nutritious, great tasting food for their family.  Pick up your copy of the booklet “6 Easy Common Sense Tips To Ban Bugs From Your Garden Without Chemicals”.
 

USDA Finally Starting To Get It Right

  
There is a new web page up on the USDA web site called the Compass.  It features a map showing the USDA supported projects and programs related to local and regional food systems.  It is titled “Know Your Farmer Know Your Food”.

Its purpose is to show consumers what is going on with local and regional farmers who sell locally.  The map shows the location of projects helped by the USDA.  There are a lot of pins in the map and there needs to be a lot more.  You can find the site at http://www.usda.gov/wps/portal/usda/usdahome?navid=KYF_COMPASS.  The link for the map is at the bottom of that page.

Also, you will find a pdf with facts about the local farmer and the USDA.   A chart shows that 79 percent of the farmers selling local or regional have sales under $50,000.  That means there are a lot of small farmers just getting started with their projects.

I think it is great that the USDA is helping the small farmer make a connection with the consumers.  As more and more people get fed up, so to speak, with the present quality of there food, and the method of delivery we now have in the our food system, there will be people willing to provide the quality food that the local market demands.

That is good news for the consumer.  For the first time in decades the food shopper will be able to look the person in the eye who grows her or his food and see the quality of what they will get to eat.

The quality of our food supply has been declining for years.  The amount of chemicals poured on our food is staggering.  It seems the swing of any cycle has to reach a breaking point before it start starts the other way.  I think we are reaching that point.

You may want to visit the site just to see what is going on.  Maybe you will want to be one of those who can grow good organic vegetables for your local market.

Great gardening,
Steve

Steve Wisley has been gardening organically for over a quarter of a century.  Gardening is a great way to, not only, grow great tasting, healthy, chemical free food that is good for your family, but gardening is reconnecting with your soul.  It is getting your hands in the stuff that life is based upon, and it can heal some of hurt you feel inside.  

Steve started this blog to guide others in starting and improving their organic garden to produce healthy, nutritious, great tasting food for their family.  Pick up your copy of the booklet “6 Easy Common Sense Tips To Ban Bugs From Your Garden Without Chemicals”.
 

Starting Seeds Indoors

Starting seeds indoors is a little different from starting seeds directly in the ground outside.  I do not start very many of my plants indoors, but I do start the ones I want to get an extra early start, like broccoli and cabbage.

The problem with starting seeds indoors is the fact that you are supplying all the needs for that plant to grow and thrive.  This means the growing medium must be right on, the temperature must be correct, the light has to be just right and they need constant moisture, sounds like we are raising a pet.

To start a seed you need soil to grow it in and we discussed that in an earlier post, so we will not go into that here.  Get your preferred medium to start your seeds.  I like to moisten the “potting” soil before sowing the seeds.

If you water after placing the seed you can wash the seed out of the soil, flush it over to the side of the pot where you do not want it or cover it too deep.  Soaking the soil first makes sure the soil is moist through out the mixture and not just on top.  

I have a tray with a dome lid that I use to start a lot of plants.  It is easy to pour water in the bottom of the tray to keep the pots moist and the dome holds moisture in so the soil does not dry as fast.  Be careful about over watering.  There is a disease called damping off that can attack the seedlings while still in the pot.  To read an article on damping off go to http://anrcatalog.ucdavis.edu/pdf/8041.pdf .

It is very disheartening to have a tray of seedlings growing tall and all of a sudden they start to wilt.  One day you will have an upright plant, the next it is flat on the soil.  If this happens to you get the healthy plants out of the post as soon as possible, wash the soil off the roots and repot the plants.

You will rarely have problems if you will use a soil mix like I explain in the other post.  Using compost in your potting mix helps to overcome the fungus that attacks the plants.

Ok, have the soil ready?  Now, place a couple of seeds in each pot.  You want to plant two seeds to insure you get one plant.  Some seeds will not geminate.  Usually, you are planting small seeds and they can be difficult to handle.  

I like to use a lead pencil or a sharp wooden dowel to plant each seed.  Just wet the pencil in water and touch it to the seed.  The moisture will pick up the seed and you can transfer it to the pot.  Tedious I know, but rewarding.

A garden heating pad and grow light is the best way to go if you want to spend the money.  I just place the pots in a warm place, like on top of the refrigerator, until they start to sprout.  If using a heating pad and light it is best to use a sensor to keep the temperature at the correct setting, small seedlings like it warm, and keep the grow light just above the seedlings.

After the seedlings are up and growing keep them lightly moist.  When they start to set true leaves, the first leaves are not true leaves, you can put a little fish fertilizer in a watering can or mister bottle and give them a shot of plant food.  Don’t overdo the fertilizing as it can cause more harm than good.  We good strong healthy plants not plants that will out grow themselves and not be good fruit producers.

As it gets close to time to set the plants in the garden soil give them some time outside in the sun and wind every day.  This will get them accustomed to the sun and toughen them up for the life in the real world.

The above information should give you a start on growing your own plants.  Starting your own plants allows you to get the type of plant you want and they are much cheaper than buying the plant ready to plant.

We will cover more about starting plants in other posts.

Great gardening,
Steve

Steve Wisley has been gardening organically for over a quarter of a century.  Gardening is a great way to, not only, grow great tasting, healthy, chemical free food that is good for your family, but gardening is reconnecting with your soul.  It is getting your hands in the stuff that life is based upon, and it can heal some of hurt you feel inside.  

Steve started this blog to guide others in starting and improving their organic garden to produce healthy, nutritious, great tasting food for their family.  Pick up your copy of the booklet “6 Easy Common Sense Tips To Ban Bugs From Your Garden Without Chemicals”.
 

Parsnip – A New Vegetable For Me

I have eaten parsnip for quite awhile, off-and-on. Parsnips have a unique flavor that is a good addition to stews or baked mixed vegetables. I recently made a beef stew with potatoes, carrots, green beans, corn, cabbage and one parsnip. You get that little bite of surprise in your meal.

When roasted with other vegetables parsnips have a sweet taste. They are best when left in the ground until after a heavy frost, like carrots. I just throw a parsnip in a baking dish lightly greased with olive oil or coconut oil, add carrots, potatoes and maybe broccoli, then sprinkle a little olive oil on top and bake at 350 degrees until tender. Makes a quick, good tasting and healthy side dish.

I think the main reason I never grew parsnips before is due to the fact that they are slow to germinate and they grow all summer. The seed has maturity dates from 110 days to 120 days, that’s a long time.

Parsnips are grown much like carrots. They like a deep, fertile, loose soils. So, I think I will make a raised bed in the row I plant the seed into, after mixing deeply with lots of compost and maybe add some peat and sand to the soil.

Since, they take a long time to germinate, 3 weeks, I will need to keep the soil moist and keep it from crusting. Sometimes I put a heavy material strip right over the row to hold in moisture until the plants start to come up. That’s why I wish it was easier to find burlap. You used to buy feed in burlap bags, now they are all paper. It is heavy, holds moisture and, was, easy to find.

A board can be used to lay over the row to keep moisture, but you have to be on top of it when the seeds pop up. The board needs to be removed so the plants can grow.

The catalog said to plant early in the spring, but I think I will try a few in the spring and then wait until July to plant a second crop. That way, I can have a crop in late summer and again in late fall.

That will give some very sweet parsnips for stews this fall.

I hope this has wetted your appetite for some roasted parsnips or to try some in a stew. You can run down to your local organic food store and pick up a parsnip to give it a try, before you make the commitment to grow a crop all summer then not like the taste.

Good gardening
Steve

Steve Wisley has been gardening organically for over a quarter of a century.  Gardening is a great way to, not only, grow great tasting, healthy, chemical free food that is good for your family, but gardening is reconnecting with your soul.  It is getting your hands in the stuff that life is based upon, and it can heal some of hurt you feel inside.  

Steve started this blog to guide others in starting and improving their organic garden to produce healthy, nutritious, great tasting food for their family.  Pick up your copy of the booklet “6 Easy Common Sense Tips To Ban Bugs From Your Garden Without Chemicals”.
 

 

Time For Garden Seeds

Have you picked up your garden seeds?  I received mine in the mail last week.  I usually order most of my seeds, besides what I save, from a seed catalog.

Now, I am all for buying local and supporting the neighbors, but when it comes to seeds there is a much larger choice of type and variety from the better seed companies.

As a plus, you can easily get heirloom varieties from many of the seed companies today.  A lot of the local garden stores only carry the hybrid seeds.

It is wise to put in your order early because they will sometimes run out of some varieties late in the season, and occasionally, there will be a crop failure and you will have to change to another type.

If you are planning to raise some of your own plants, like tomatoes or peppers, you will want your seeds early to get a head start.  You will want to take a look at the growing suggestions from the seed supplier.  They will tell you how long before the last frost date to start your seeds.

I like to start seeds at different times.  That way if the frost comes late, and my plants lose their quality, I will still have good strong plants coming on for a later planting.  Crops like tomatoes will get leggy and will be slow to take off when transplanted and never seem to do as good as they should when they do not get planted on time and sorta’ outgrow themselves.

So, if you do not have your seeds yet, now is the time.  Make this the year you try something new.  If you haven’t raised your own plants before get started this spring.  Maybe, you can find a new variety of vegetable or flower you have not raised before, make this year the time to give it a try.  Or, if you have never gardened before jump in there and get your hands dirty.  You may find a part of your soul you have been missing.

Steve Wisley has been gardening organically for over a quarter of a century.  Gardening is a great way to, not only, grow great tasting, healthy, chemical free food that is good for your family, but gardening is reconnecting with your soul.  It is getting your hands in the stuff that life is based upon, and it can heal some of hurt you feel inside.  Steve started this blog to guide others in starting and improving their organic garden to produce healthy, nutritious, great tasting food for their family.  Pick up your free copy of the booklet “6 Easy Common Sense Tips To Ban Bugs From Your Garden Without Chemicals”.